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Season 5 Doctor Who

Posted by Stephen John Murray on Wednesday, January 5, 2011

                     

Dr Who Eleventh Doctor Season 5

“Who-the –man....I’m never saying that again”

Maybe, but the season itself you can watch over and over, as it is quite simply the best season of Dr Who ever. The ongoing plot with the crack in the wall has been the most compelling viewing I’ve ever experienced since the programme began in 1963.

After much trepidation over Matt Smith’s portrayal of the Doctor, I had plenty of resistance to liking him after such a brilliant David Tennant. But like him we do; he is a cross between David himself and Tom Baker, so who could ask for more.

For those of us that remember that the doctor can only have 12 regenerations, and possibly 13 as the Time Lords changed the second doctor’s appearance so does that count? We hope that Matt’s stay is a long one because the programme may come to end again. The Doctor dying is some heroic act, perish the thought, there wouldn’t be a dry eye in the house.

Season five starts with a bang with  the Tardis crash landing onto Amelia Pond’s garden, and revealing a doctor that is still “cooking” and is starving for food that he doesn’t have a clue what for. A nice touch, as fish fingers with custard is now a new dish, which many fans have tried.

There are some original and scary ideas in this season as Dr Who continues to explore new territory. I love the perception thing about something not quite normal that appears out of the range of what you can normally see in the opening episode of The Eleventh Hour. The idea behind people being taken over while in a comatose state is brilliant. And in Amy’s Choice the use of old people as vessels for aliens that turn use to dust with horrible guns that come out of their mouths.  Of course the Doctor has a long history of making the familiar appear the stuff of nightmares.

Where were these writers when Dr Who was doing its classic run....but we all know it wasn’t the ideas that were limiting, but the budget? Thank heavens for advancements in special effects and the decision to turn the programme into a more adult related show. The show has legs that could potentially go on walking for many years to come.

Many old favourites make a return in this season, a reworking of the plot of “The Power of the Daleks” in episode 3 Victory of the Daleks with a new Dalek design. Which is growing on me, the use of bright colours is naff, but the decayed look in the Big Bang made them much more appealing.

The Angels 2-parter is another stunner with Amy falling victim to the spell of the Angel and the return of Dr River Song. The character of River is such an inspired thought of a woman that is supposed to be the Doctors wife and knows more about him than he does. The fact that she keeps showing up in his life in the “wrong order” is quite funny and keeps us guessing. The sense of mystery is very compelling, and as long as they can keep this up, people are going to be kept glued to the TV.

My two favourite episodes are the Vincent and the Doctor & The Lodger, two cracking good yarns.

The use of history of course being one of the reasons for the Doctors original conception, but previously been used too often and to dull and tedious end. Not so in this case, the writer use of fact and fiction blending perfectly with a heart-warming end that again makes you reach for the tissues. Such is the power of this season that made me cry no less than five times throughout the season.  The thing of placing real people in Dr Who is that it can make you rewrite history in your head to the point of the Who version being the one that you prefer.  It is crazy to think that Van Gogh was thought of as a crap painter in his day, but his tormented life producing stunning works of art.

The Lodger being the other favourite, I love romantic stories that bring couples together under trying circumstances. In this episode the Doctor gets quite philosophical with his trick of making them realise that there is more to life than you thought.  The use of lighting in this show and the mysterious room at the top of the landing makes you glad that most people only live in one storey houses.

The season ends with tying up most of the loose ends of the crack in the wall story with the fascinating concept of the Alliance getting rid of the Doctor. But the Doctor continues to surprise us with ways of getting out of danger. In the finale The Big Bang the idea of things returning to normal just by remembering is a powerful idea. As many people we know and love die, and if threw away all the photos and locked those memories away in some dark place it would be like they never existed.

The use of humour in this season has been great, and here we see the Doctor sporting a Fezz hat, great stuff as I have one in my collection representing the late Tommy Cooper.

Writers are not suppose to use old and tired cliché’s, but in the case of the Big Bang, the use of the “something old, something borrowed, something blue” was a touch of genius and the Doctors appearance at the wedding was hilarious and touching at the same time.

May the writers and producers of this show continue to surprise and entertain us, because although we hate to admit the reworking of Doctor Who leaves the old classic show for dead. It is exciting, enthralling, moves at a break-neck pace, has plenty of humour, brilliant stories and new ideas and is quite simply the only reason for watching TV these days.

Matt Smith, we love you, at a tender age of 26 he has done a marvellous job of keeping Who alive.

“Live long and prosper”

Season 6 hurry up and get here, I’m dying of anticipation....



Season 5 Doctor Who

Posted by Stephen John Murray on Wednesday, January 5, 2011

                     

Dr Who Eleventh Doctor Season 5

“Who-the –man....I’m never saying that again”

Maybe, but the season itself you can watch over and over, as it is quite simply the best season of Dr Who ever. The ongoing plot with the crack in the wall has been the most compelling viewing I’ve ever experienced since the programme began in 1963.

After much trepidation over Matt Smith’s portrayal of the Doctor, I had plenty of resistance to liking him after such a brilliant David Tennant. But like him we do; he is a cross between David himself and Tom Baker, so who could ask for more.

For those of us that remember that the doctor can only have 12 regenerations, and possibly 13 as the Time Lords changed the second doctor’s appearance so does that count? We hope that Matt’s stay is a long one because the programme may come to end again. The Doctor dying is some heroic act, perish the thought, there wouldn’t be a dry eye in the house.

Season five starts with a bang with  the Tardis crash landing onto Amelia Pond’s garden, and revealing a doctor that is still “cooking” and is starving for food that he doesn’t have a clue what for. A nice touch, as fish fingers with custard is now a new dish, which many fans have tried.

There are some original and scary ideas in this season as Dr Who continues to explore new territory. I love the perception thing about something not quite normal that appears out of the range of what you can normally see in the opening episode of The Eleventh Hour. The idea behind people being taken over while in a comatose state is brilliant. And in Amy’s Choice the use of old people as vessels for aliens that turn use to dust with horrible guns that come out of their mouths.  Of course the Doctor has a long history of making the familiar appear the stuff of nightmares.

Where were these writers when Dr Who was doing its classic run....but we all know it wasn’t the ideas that were limiting, but the budget? Thank heavens for advancements in special effects and the decision to turn the programme into a more adult related show. The show has legs that could potentially go on walking for many years to come.

Many old favourites make a return in this season, a reworking of the plot of “The Power of the Daleks” in episode 3 Victory of the Daleks with a new Dalek design. Which is growing on me, the use of bright colours is naff, but the decayed look in the Big Bang made them much more appealing.

The Angels 2-parter is another stunner with Amy falling victim to the spell of the Angel and the return of Dr River Song. The character of River is such an inspired thought of a woman that is supposed to be the Doctors wife and knows more about him than he does. The fact that she keeps showing up in his life in the “wrong order” is quite funny and keeps us guessing. The sense of mystery is very compelling, and as long as they can keep this up, people are going to be kept glued to the TV.

My two favourite episodes are the Vincent and the Doctor & The Lodger, two cracking good yarns.

The use of history of course being one of the reasons for the Doctors original conception, but previously been used too often and to dull and tedious end. Not so in this case, the writer use of fact and fiction blending perfectly with a heart-warming end that again makes you reach for the tissues. Such is the power of this season that made me cry no less than five times throughout the season.  The thing of placing real people in Dr Who is that it can make you rewrite history in your head to the point of the Who version being the one that you prefer.  It is crazy to think that Van Gogh was thought of as a crap painter in his day, but his tormented life producing stunning works of art.

The Lodger being the other favourite, I love romantic stories that bring couples together under trying circumstances. In this episode the Doctor gets quite philosophical with his trick of making them realise that there is more to life than you thought.  The use of lighting in this show and the mysterious room at the top of the landing makes you glad that most people only live in one storey houses.

The season ends with tying up most of the loose ends of the crack in the wall story with the fascinating concept of the Alliance getting rid of the Doctor. But the Doctor continues to surprise us with ways of getting out of danger. In the finale The Big Bang the idea of things returning to normal just by remembering is a powerful idea. As many people we know and love die, and if threw away all the photos and locked those memories away in some dark place it would be like they never existed.

The use of humour in this season has been great, and here we see the Doctor sporting a Fezz hat, great stuff as I have one in my collection representing the late Tommy Cooper.

Writers are not suppose to use old and tired cliché’s, but in the case of the Big Bang, the use of the “something old, something borrowed, something blue” was a touch of genius and the Doctors appearance at the wedding was hilarious and touching at the same time.

May the writers and producers of this show continue to surprise and entertain us, because although we hate to admit the reworking of Doctor Who leaves the old classic show for dead. It is exciting, enthralling, moves at a break-neck pace, has plenty of humour, brilliant stories and new ideas and is quite simply the only reason for watching TV these days.

Matt Smith, we love you, at a tender age of 26 he has done a marvellous job of keeping Who alive.

“Live long and prosper”

Season 6 hurry up and get here, I’m dying of anticipation....



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